Implementing UNSCR 2250: Youth and Religious Actors Engaging for Peace

The bulk of the world’s most violent conflicts happen in countries with youthful populations, and 80% of the world identifies as religious.  However, youth and local religious actors are routinely under-utilized in peacebuilding, if not left out of the process altogether, according to this report published by the U.S. Institute of Peace. Youth leaders and religious leaders both can lend legitimacy to peacebuilding efforts and provide access to vulnerable communities. However, to maximize the impact of these groups in preventing conflict and sustaining peace, the international community and peacebuilding practitioners are encouraged to build trust between youth and religious leaders, identify allies in each of these communities, and involve religious actors, youth leaders, and religious youth in peace dialogues at various levels. Read the full report here.

“Women nowadays do anything”: Women’s role in conflict, peace and security in Yemen

This article by Marie-Christine Heinze and Marwa Baabad draws from interview-based research by the Yemen Polling Center, Center for Applied Research in Partnership with the Orient, and Saferworld to discuss the impact of conflict on women and the roles of women in conflict and peacebuilding in two regions of Yemen—Aden and Ibb. This research identifies common, general concerns in both regions with regard to the impact of conflict on women and families, including deleterious economic impacts, increased isolation of women, health consequences, and increased proliferation of arms. Additionally, women play a significant role in peacebuilding efforts in both areas. While generalities exist, it is important to remember that the relationship between women, conflict and peacebuilding is unique to each locale. As such, local, national and international institutions need to build on all women’s contributions to peacebuilding initiatives—even those that seem insignificant—in order to maximize the efficacy of these efforts. Read the full article here.

Civil Society, Human Security, and the Politics of Peace-building in Victor’s Peace Sri Lanka (2009-2012)

This thesis by Janel Smith examines the role of civil society in peace-building using the case study of post-war Sri Lanka. The “victor’s peace,” i.e. war that didn’t end through a peace agreement, enabled acts of securitization by Sri Lanka’s central government that resulted in a repressive environment, limiting the peace-building impact of civil society. Further, civil society itself is shown to be a complicated arena in which some actors might support the victor’s peace for reasons of self-interest rather than other more positive or altruistic reasons. Throughout, Smith uses the analytical tool of Human Security, which considers threats against individuals in evaluating peace, and in doing so also evaluates the concept and utility of Human Security itself. Read the full article here.